Why Time Management Is The Secret Of Academic Success

Girls and boys, it is time to face reality. The exam dates are out and the “why bother, tomorrow is another day” attitude may not be the best idea anymore. Things need to be done. And time needs to be managed.

How to efficiently use my time is one of the major things I’ve learned so far during my stay in Ireland. Not only because studying in a foreign language requires a different study approach and definitely more time, but also because I want to make the most of the two months I still got left in Limerick.

Starting with my assignments soon enough enables me to dedicate more time to each of them, more time and more patience. With a clear head I can produce results of higher quality than in a late-night-coffee-boost-I-need-to-get-it-done-by-tomorrow session. No doubt we have all been there. But it is time to learn from our mistakes.

Is there an ideal approach?

Well, it is all about identifying one’s study-type. It took me a few semesters, a lot of coffee, chocolate and frustration to discover mine. Generally, I tend to invest a lot of time in each task and I can concentrate best during the late afternoon. For memorizing I need complete silence, writing essays is easier with some piano music. I therefore learned how to structure my schedule around this.

And it works! I can’t complain about my marks and even though my free time is almost non-existent towards the end of the semester, it is worth it. In the end, studying is a full-time job. We must not forget that.

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When you realise that your plan is actually working…

All images: pixabay.com

Mastering The Irish English As A Non-Native

In the beginning was the word. Let’s specify – the English word.

Okay, most of us are old hands in dealing with English. Going-to-future, irregular verbs or the past progressive, we know it all. Still, the Irish English is not in every aspect what we learned in school. Let me present you some typical local idioms that crossed my way during my semester in Ireland.

  1. No worries, you’re grand. (The word grand works nearly always. Meaning okay, good, fine, great, alright and everything in that sense you want it to, it is an easy way to get your Irish slang started.)
  2. Let’s go and have some craic! (Means not what you think it does. Craic is another word for fun or a good time. No drugs involved here, I promise.)
  3. Tanks. (Okay, this is actually not a real English word. However, Irish people don’t pronounce the th as fastidiously as we learned it back then. Who want’s an Irish slang should better kick out the h out of thanks and similar words.)
  4. Will ye be there? (Ye stands for you, y’all or everyone. No matter if in written or spoken English, not one day has passed in which I haven’t encountered these two letters.)
  5. Hiya. (A more creative way of saying Hi, Hello or Hey. People will see that you totally know what you are dealing with.)

To be fair, I am still not 100% comfortable using them in every day life. No doubt it is fun, but it doesn’t really feel natural. However, the journey is the reward, so i thing my best bet is to simply continue using and expanding this vocabulary.

Curious about Erasmus life in the University of Limerick? I will reflect about my learning process in my next posts.

Featured Image © 2016 Silva Hanekamp