The Moment When You Turn Into A Personal Brand

What do Coca-Cola, Apple and You have in common? It is this one question from my lecture on “Interaction, Relationships and Networks” that inspired me to make my mind up about something I’ve never really considered important – personal branding.

Well, the answer is pretty straightforward. Just like an iPhone or a bottle of Coke, our chances in the market depend on how we market ourselves. Just as Apple or Coca-Cola represent strong brands in their respective industries, so should we while hunting for jobs.

  • What do I stand for?
  • How do I want to be seen by possible employers?
  • How am I selling myself?

It is time for some reflection on core values, strengths and an increasingly demanding labour market. I am happy about the incentive and the insight that reflection is not only important inside university. How academic it might feel, this is true life. I know I tend to forget that while sitting inside these big walls.

To dive into the topic this guide about How to build your personal brand has helped me a lot as well as Peter Montoya’s book The Personal Branding Phenomenon. Everything I learned in this lecture is definitely going to help me for future job applications.

Maybe it could help you, too!

Image: pixabay.com

 

Mastering The Irish English As A Non-Native

In the beginning was the word. Let’s specify – the English word.

Okay, most of us are old hands in dealing with English. Going-to-future, irregular verbs or the past progressive, we know it all. Still, the Irish English is not in every aspect what we learned in school. Let me present you some typical local idioms that crossed my way during my semester in Ireland.

  1. No worries, you’re grand. (The word grand works nearly always. Meaning okay, good, fine, great, alright and everything in that sense you want it to, it is an easy way to get your Irish slang started.)
  2. Let’s go and have some craic! (Means not what you think it does. Craic is another word for fun or a good time. No drugs involved here, I promise.)
  3. Tanks. (Okay, this is actually not a real English word. However, Irish people don’t pronounce the th as fastidiously as we learned it back then. Who want’s an Irish slang should better kick out the h out of thanks and similar words.)
  4. Will ye be there? (Ye stands for you, y’all or everyone. No matter if in written or spoken English, not one day has passed in which I haven’t encountered these two letters.)
  5. Hiya. (A more creative way of saying Hi, Hello or Hey. People will see that you totally know what you are dealing with.)

To be fair, I am still not 100% comfortable using them in every day life. No doubt it is fun, but it doesn’t really feel natural. However, the journey is the reward, so i thing my best bet is to simply continue using and expanding this vocabulary.

Curious about Erasmus life in the University of Limerick? I will reflect about my learning process in my next posts.

Featured Image © 2016 Silva Hanekamp